Becoming a Social Enterprise takes guts — The Social Enterprise

Becoming a Social Enterprise takes guts — The Social Enterprise Imagine being part of the leadership of a corporation that is challenged, through social media, economic changes and social changes, to move from a (now) traditional Anglo-American corporation model to a modern Social Enterprise. Would you know where to...

Why art school may be the new business school

Artists often possess the skills and temperament that business leaders regularly say are in short supply: creativity, resiliency, flexibility, high tolerance for risk and ambiguity, as well as the courage to fail. Why art school may be the new business school (via...

Het Voys Handboek | Voys

Het Voys Handboek | Voys Voys is een bedrijf waar de medewerker centraal staat en dat geen management kent. Het Voys handboek is 1 van de mijlpalen in dit traject. In het interview met Ronald vertelt Mark Vletter over hun Handboek. Hier lees je er meer over, en kun je het ook...

A happy employee is a productive one

fastcompany: You’ve probably heard that a happy employee is a productive one who can boost the bottom line. But just how much? Here are some numbers: 33% higher profitability (Gallup) 43% more productivity (Hay Group) 37% higher sales (Shawn Achor) 300% more innovation (HBR) 51% lower turnover (Gallup) 50% less safety incidents (Babcock Marine Clyde) 66% decrease in sick leave (Forbes) 125% less burnout (HBR) Here, some tips for staying happy at...

Learning From Los Gatos

Learning From Los Gatos parislemon: Steven Johnson responding to a New Yorker column by George Packer: Sure, companies went public or sold for staggering sums, but companies have been going public or selling out for generations without creating tens of thousands of millionaires along the way. The defining difference between Silicon Valley companies and almost every other industry in the U.S. is the virtually universal practice among tech companies of distributing meaningful equity (usually in the form of stock options) to ordinary employees. Before companies like Fairchild and Hewlett-Packard began the practice fifty years ago, distributing stock options to anyone other than top management was virtually unheard of. But the engineering tradition that spawned Silicon Valley was much more egalitarian than traditional corporate culture. Many great points...